Sunday, 27 January 2013

Land locked locks

Following several loads of washing and lovely long (by boat standards) showers on Saturday morning, we discovered that the water point was locked off out of use - no explanation. So we decided to move on towards Denver sluice to use the water point and pump out up there. Well, this is how we found the pump out! Graham managed to use bits from our self pump out to get the job done and reported the problem to EA. Fortunately the well insulated water tap was working.
Leaving MR on the service point, I walked the dogs up onto the sluice
 Looking back upstream
 We intended to move down through the Relief Channel to Downham Market this Sunday morning, but there was altogether too much water running and the hooley that had blown all night, keeping us awake, was still blowing. So that was that plan out of the window. G has to be in Ely tomorrow for a physio appointment so he's going to have to walk into Downham to catch the train. Given that we were temporarily stuck, G decided to go and have a look at the prison gates locks that are keeping us here together with high tides and lock stoppages. I must admit, it was pretty shocking.
First we have to go through Denver Lock. This shows the sandbank on the exit side ie downstream on the tidal stretch. In the foreground is the lock landing for coming upstream and the lock itself is just off to the bottom left hand corner of this photo

 You can see the lock itself in this picture
 Standing over the lock itself, looking downstream the way we need to leave. How low this tide is I don't know, but nothing and no-one is coming through this lock in either direction.
 A little further on we need to turn left into Salters Lock which gives us access to the Middle Levels, River Nene (in flood again) and, our ultimate goal, the Grand Union Canal to rejoin the waterways network.

This is the entrance to Salters Lock, between the fence and the tyres.
 Mmmmm ...
 All contributions to the crane hire and low loader fund will be gratefully received!
As I type this (it's just after 10.00pm Sunday), they've opened up the big sluices due to flood water (Earith to Bedford), high tides and melting snow and the back of MR is now 15 ft out and sat on the bottom on the tilt. We are waiting   for EA to ring us back as to when we are likely to be re-floated - I suspect that there's not going to be a lot of sleep to be had tonight either.

13 comments:

  1. Dramatic photos Jill - those sandbanks are awful - just as well you've found enough lovely moorings to keep yourself amused but I guess that even kingfishers will lose their appeal if you don't escape soon.

    Wouldn't it be good if there was the equivalent of a double-decker car transporter for narrowboats - that way you and Yarwood could escape together :-)

    Stay snug and safe.

    Sue, nb Indigo Dream

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    1. Trouble is that there aren't enough lovely moorings, we can't get to the good stuff the other side of Earith. Please send us a transporter!!

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  2. Replies
    1. Shame we missed you. It's not a pretty sight is it? Great pics

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  3. call on danny at denver complex he controls water

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    1. Thanks Carol, have been in touch with Danny and Mervyn (or is it Melvyn?).

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    2. Thanks Carol, we've spoken to Danny and Mervyn - it's just a shame they can't warn you BEFORE they pull the plug out

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  4. I have a shovel and wellies if that's any help.

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    1. Only if you have a wheelbarrow as well - perhaps we could organise a sand sculpture competition; that might shift a bit Andy

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  5. I am going to organise a Triumph Club trip out to Denver later in the year, lunch at the Jenyns arms, a look at the complex and Denver windmill, via Mildenhall and using the narrow road from the A10 at Littleport but that will be in the sunnier times so you will be long gone.

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    1. I sincerely hope we will be long gone!

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